Home » Buck from Staggs Creek: Appalachian Tall Tales - One, Colloquial Dialect Edition by Peggy Poe Stern
Buck from Staggs Creek: Appalachian Tall Tales - One, Colloquial Dialect Edition Peggy Poe Stern

Buck from Staggs Creek: Appalachian Tall Tales - One, Colloquial Dialect Edition

Peggy Poe Stern

Published October 7th 2011
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
73 pages
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 About the Book 

Buck from Staggs Creek: Appalachian Tall Tales – One, Colloquial Dialect Edition, (Peggy’s 25th book, general fiction), 28,500 words, 90 pages (paperback)From Chapter 1:As I came up the winding trail to the Jones place, I seed her dippin’ up a pailMoreBuck from Staggs Creek: Appalachian Tall Tales – One, Colloquial Dialect Edition, (Peggy’s 25th book, general fiction), 28,500 words, 90 pages (paperback)From Chapter 1:As I came up the winding trail to the Jones place, I seed her dippin’ up a pail of water from the spring branch. The house was just outta sight over the rise behind a clump of birches. She turned around and seed me and just stood there a waiting. The sight of her purt nigh stopped the wind in my throat. Her sleeves were rolled up, and her arms, throat, and feet were all bare and white as anything I ever saw. Her eyes were shining like a fresh-opened buckeye, and her hair was like sunshine reflecting off a chunk of coal. I swallowed a time or two afore I spoke.“Mornin’ Laurel,” I says right proper like as I took off my favorite cap. “How’s you-all this mornin’?”Water dripped off her pail onto a bare foot. “Maw’s spotted boar hog took a right severe chunk outta Fred’s left buttock last night, outside of that we all be a doin’ fine.”I reckoned her runt brother war never going to figure out how to ride that hog, else he’d a done it already. Fool kid. Boar hogs warn’t nothing to ride. Like setting on a log, but Fred war a bit slow. Course, I’d never mention such a notion to Laurel. She’s right partial to her brothers.“Air you glued to that mule?” She wanted to know.“No’m,” I says as I clumb down and reached for her pail. “Let me tote that heavy pail fur you.” I says in my best would-be courtin voice.She started to let me take it from her, then reared back and took a closer look at me. She drawed that pail back from my hand right fast. “You been a fightin’ agen,” she accused.“Twarn’t nothin’,” I says as I remembered the scratch. “Warn’t no fight. We’s jest aplayin’.”“Done gone and ruint another shirt,” she continued as she pointed a finger at my knifed shirt. “Who was it you fit with this time?”“Warn’t nobody. Jest Joel Sexton. You know good’n well he ain’t got no playin’ manners. Playin’ fair just ain’t in him.”“You fight too much.”“Warn’t no fight.” I make a p’int of tellin’ her agen. “He throwed off on Critter, here. Said I ought to get myself a hoss to ride. Said it warn’t right for a Jackass to ride a Jackass.”“Who licked?”“Why,” I says, plumb shocked at her fur asking sech a question. “Don’t I allus lick?”Odd enough, she seemed irritated. “You think you’re the goll-fired toughest thing walkin’ around these parts.”I answered her as truthfully as I knowed how. “Fact is I am, except fur my own pap.” Pap and I both knowed he could put a right severe lickin’ on me when he set his mind to it.Truth didn’t seem to be what she was after. She whirled around and took a step closer me, her eyes blazing. “You han’t never fit none of my brothers or my pap,” she spouted off in her bragging way.Now that was a true statement. “That’s right,” I agree. “They’s your brothers and your pap. I’ve took a right smart of sass offa them hooligans cause of you. Didn’t want to hurt none of your kin.”Gals can be mighty funny about some things. Truth is one of the things, I reckon.“Oh, is that so!” she says.